These are sources for the statistics found in our Open Textbook Guide.

88% – The amount textbook prices have risen over the past decade—that’s 3 times the rate of inflation. (Source: Consumer Price Index for Tuition and School-Related Items, Bureau of Labor Statistics)

65% – The percentage of students who report that they skipped buying or renting an assigned textbook because of cost. (Source: Fixing the Broken Textbook Market, Student PIRGs)

26% – The percentage of students who report that they occasionally or frequently drop a course because the textbook cost is too high. (Source: 2016 Student Textbook and Course Materials Survey, Florida Virtual Campus)

A 2013 report by the Student PIRGs found that a large majority of students skip buying or renting some of their required textbooks due to cost. Of those students, 94 percent recognized that skipping the book would impact their grade in a course, but did so anyway. (Source: Fixing the Broken Textbook Market, Student PIRGs)

Relatively small amounts of money can create big obstacles for students who are just getting by. Research at Morgan State University showed that 10% of students who dropped out for financial reasons owed the university less than $1,000. (Source: Dropout Rate for College Students Driven by Income Inequality, Nonprofit Quarterly)

In a recent study of non-college-going students by the McKinsey Center for Government, 48% cited an inability to pay as the reason they weren’t attending school, and 16% cited their need to spend time working instead of studying. (Source: Education to Employment: Designing a System that Works, McKinsey Center for Government)

Nearly half of all students say that the cost of course materials impacts which classes and how many classes they are able to take. (Source: Fixing the Broken Textbook Market, Student PIRGs)

Recent research has shown that open textbooks are as effective, if not more effective, than traditionally-published course materials. (Source: A Multi-Institutional Study of the Impact of Open Textbook Adoption on the Learning Outcomes of Post-Secondary Students, Journal of Computing in Higher Education)

Open textbooks have the potential to save students nationwide up to a billion dollars per year. (Source: Open Textbooks: The Billion Dollar Solution, Student PIRGs)

Data from Tidewater Community College shows greater student retention and performance when faculty members become more engaged with the classroom materials. (Source: The “Z-Degree”: Removing Textbook Costs as a Barrier to Student Success through an OER-Based Curriculum, Tidewater Community College)

A journal-published analysis of OER programs at public institutions showed that students using open materials perform as well, if not better, than their peers using traditional course materials. (Source: A Multi-Institutional Study of the Impact of Open Textbook Adoption on the Learning Outcomes of Post-Secondary Students, Journal of Computing in Higher Education)

40% of faculty members who attend a workshop hosted by the Open Textbook Network end up adopting open textbooks in their classrooms. (Source: Impact and Benefits, Open Textbook Network)

A 2014 analysis of existing OER grant programs found that the return on investment, as measured by student savings, ranged from 6:1 to as high as 25:1. (Source: Open Textbooks: The Billion Dollar Solution, Student PIRGs)